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Sugar Snaps and Strawberries – a Book Give-Away!


A wonderful young writer has written a guide to growing food in small spaces, and it’s getting rave reviews – probably because it covers all the basics in a fun, conversational tone, and is packed with terrific photos.   Sugar Snaps and Strawberries is a winner and to garden bloggers across the globe, this is no surprise at all – we’ve known author Andrea Bellamy for years by her popular blog Heavy Petal, which she launched in 2005 (the Dark Ages of blogging).

So we’re seeing rave reviews of the book across the famous “blogosphere”, like this review from Dee in Oklahoma.  She notes the book’s “rock n roll vibe” and talk of guerrilla gardening, but wonders “What else would you expect of someone who named her blog  Heavy Petal?  Well, exactly.  Dee praised the photography, too, calling it “eye candy”.    And we can never have too much of that, especially in late January.

Then on Garden Rant I gushed a bit over the book and reminisced about being inspired by Andrea to start my own blog, which I did just two months later.

Writers in print are noticing, too, like the reviewer for Portland Monthly Magazine, who praised the book’s “stylish yet substantial introduction to growing edibles in small spaces,” and calls it “the perfect book”.   She goes on:

Sugar Snaps & Strawberries would make a fantastic gift for a brand-new gardener launching into his or her first garden, as well as for anyone seeking for inspiration and ideas to help them garden in a smaller space or wanting to maximize the space they have.

I like her voice: it’s sparkly, bright, and experienced – like a best friend who happens to be a kick-ass gardener, explaining the important issues, practices and techniques to you as you move through the seasons.

HOW TO WIN A COPY
Andrea’s publisher Timber Press has sent us not one but two copies of Sugar Snaps and Strawberries to give away to lucky blog-readers.  All you have to do to win is leave a comment here on the blog.  Say “hi” or “I want the book” or anything you want because the winners will be chosen at random.  Entries close February 28 and winners will be announced March 1.

by Susan Harris

Stephanie Fleming was raised at Behnke’s Nurseries in Beltsville. Her Mom, Sonja, was one of Albert & Rose Behnke’s four children. She was weeding from the moment she could walk and hiding as soon as she was old enough to run, so many weeds, so little time. Although she quickly learned how to pull out a perennial and get taken off of weed pulling duty.

This Post Has 27 Comments

  1. As an avid gardener I am always looking for a smarter, more chemical free way to maximize vegetable growing in a small space. Please pick me so that I can share the fruits of my labors with family and friends.

  2. Small-space gardening is my favorite way to garden and I’d love to have this book. I’m sure she knows things I have yet to discover.

  3. I’m moving from pots to raised beds this year – pick me for the free copy of the book – I’ll use it, promise.

  4. “Sugar Snaps and Strawberries” sounds like just what I need to start a fruit and veggie garden in an apartment. I am a beginner gardener with a little one who likes to dig with me.

  5. I want to start growing vegetables, possibly mixed in with my flowers. This book would probably be a good reference.

  6. This looks like such a great book! I only grow edibles, and living in the city, definitely need some space-saving tips and tricks. I’m so looking forward to possibly winning a copy!

  7. Fantastic!!!! Sounds like a great book for a “wannna be” gardner. Hmmm… I do think my thumb is getting a bit greener just bey reading the reviews.

  8. Having little space I am always on the look out for ideas and tips to help me out. So much for the chance!

  9. One of the first vegetables I grew for my kids was sugar snap peas. I planted along the length of chain link fence in our military housing. I read that the more you pick, the more you get. So, I told my young kids I was growing green candy on the vines. They had the fence line picked clean by the end of the day.

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