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White House Garden Update

Like so many of you, I’ve been following the famous White House Kitchen Garden these last four seasons, and here’s what it looked like two weeks ago.   There was no special tour for gardenbloggers (I wish!), just the usual twice-a-year White House Garden Tour, which isn’t a tour at all but an opportunity for the public to walk around the south grounds.

Chief White House gardener Jim Adams is always there to answer questions and when I asked about his great-looking cabbage he revealed his strategy for dealing with cabbage loopers – hand-picking.  Every day, of course.  I suggested to Jim that with a White House Garden Blog they could share their growing wisdom with all of us and he told me their tips can be found on the Let’s Move Blog.  Well, they may be there but they’re hard to find, some I’m sticking with my suggestion of a garden blog – or at least a “gardening” category on the blog.

Though not certified as an organic garden, the techniques and products used here ARE strictly organic, according to Jim.

Above you’ll notice, to the right of the weather instruments, a new feature this year – papaya!  Jim says they’re producing well already.

Award for most colorful plant in the garden goes to this Hyacinth bean vine.

The view south from the residence is world-class.

This is the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden outside the East Wing.  Lots of mums and asters in bloom.  More images and info about the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden here.

Above, what the public could see of the Rose Garden.

Posted by Susan Harris.

Stephanie Fleming

Stephanie Fleming was raised at Behnke’s Nurseries in Beltsville. Her Mom, Sonja, was one of Albert & Rose Behnke’s four children. She was weeding from the moment she could walk and hiding as soon as she was old enough to run, so many weeds, so little time. Although she quickly learned how to pull out a perennial and get taken off of weed pulling duty.

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